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Date: 03.01.2018

An Ugly Way to Die (1974)

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Vice President Gerald R. After two years of bitter public debate over the Watergate scandals, President Nixon bowed to pressures from the public and leaders of his party to become the first President in American history to resign. Kissinger will remain in his Cabinet.

The Rookies: S3 E1 - An Ugly Way to Die

The President-to-be praised Mr. Nixon said he decided he must resign when he concluded that he no longer had "a strong enough political base in the Congress" to make it possible for him to complete his term of office. Declaring that he has never been a quitter, Mr. Nixon said that to leave office before the end of his term " is abhorrent to every instinct in my body.

While the President acknowledged that some of his judgments "were wrong," he made no confession of the "high crimes and misdemeanors" with which the House Judiciary Committee charged him in its bill of impeachment.

The absence of rancor contrasted sharply with the "farewell" he delivered in after being defeated for the governorship of California. An hour before the speech, however, the President broke down during a meeting with old congressional friends and had to leave the room. He had invited 20 senators and 26 representatives for a farewell meeting in the Cabinet room.

Nixon said to them very much what he said in his speech. Then the rest of us broke down and cried. His family "unanimously urged" him to stay in office and fight the charges against him, he said. But he came to realize that he would not have the support needed to carry out the duties of his office in difficult times.

The resignation came with "a great sadness that I will not be here in this office" to complete work on the programs started, he said. But praising Vice President Ford, Mr. Nixon said that "the leadership of America will be in good hands.

When he first took the oath, he said, he made a "sacred commitment" to "consecrate my office and wisdom to the cause of peace among nations. Nixon placed great emphasis on his successes in foreign affairs. And with the Soviet Union, he said, the administration had begun the process of ending the nuclear arms race.

The goal now, he said, is to reduce and finally destroy those arms "so that the threat of nuclear war will no longer hang over the world. Nixon has served 2, days as the 37th President of the United States. Yesterday morning, the President conferred with his successor. He spent much of the day in his Executive Office Building hideaway working on his speech and attending to last-minute business. The crowd outside the gates waved U. At the EOB, Mr.

Nixon met for a little over 20 minutes with the leaders of Congress -- James O. It was exactly six years ago yesterday that the year-old Californian accepted the Republican nomination for President for the second time and went on to a narrow victory in November over Democrat Hubert H.

And events were such that this seemed to be the time the party was willing for me to carry the standard," Nixon said after winning first-ballot nomination in the convention at Miami Beach. In his acceptance speech on Aug.

The theme was repeated in his first inaugural address on Jan. Largely because of his breakthroughs in negotiations with China and the Soviet Union, and partly because of divisions in the Democratic Party, Mr. Nixon won a mammoth election victory in , only to be brought down by scandals that grew out of an excessive zeal to make certain he would win re-election. Nixon and his family are expected to fly to their home in San Clemente, Calif.

Press secretary Ronald L. Ziegler and Rose Mary Woods, Mr. Bob Haldeman on April 30, , has been asked by Mr. Ford to remain in his present position. It is expected that Haig will continue in the position as staff chief to assure an orderly transfer of responsibilities but not stay indefinitely.

The first firm indication yesterday that the President had reached a decision came when deputy press secretary Gerald L. Warren announced at He promised to post "some routine information, bill actions and appointments" and to return with additional information" in an hour or so. Reports already were circulating on Capitol Hill that the President would hold a reception for friends and staff members late in the day and a meeting with congressional leaders.

The proclamation granted Nixon a pardon for all offenses from January 20, , the day he was first inaugurated as president. The text of the proclamation takes precedence. I have come to a decision which I felt I should tell you and all of my fellow American citizens, as soon as I was certain in my own mind and in my own conscience that it is the right thing to do. I have learned already in this office that the difficult decisions always come to this desk.

I must admit that many of them do not look at all the same as the hypothetical questions that I have answered freely and perhaps too fast on previous occasions. My customary policy is to try to get all the facts and to consider the opinions of my countrymen and to take counsel with my most valued friends.

The Rookies Season 3 Episode 1 | An Ugly Way to Die

But these seldom agree, and in the end, the decision is mine. To procrastinate, to agonize, and to wait for a more favorable turn of events that may never come or more compelling external pressures that may as well be wrong as right, is itself a decision of sorts and a weak and potentially dangerous course for a President to follow. I have promised to uphold the Constitution, to do what is right as God gives me to see the right, and to do the very best that I can for America.

I have asked your help and your prayers, not only when I became President but many times since. The Constitution is the supreme law of our land and it governs our actions as citizens. Only the laws of God, which govern our consciences, are superior to it. As we are a nation under God, so I am sworn to uphold our laws with the help of God.

And I have sought such guidance and searched my own conscience with special diligence to determine the right thing for me to do with respect to my predecessor in this place, Richard Nixon, and his loyal wife and family.

Theirs is an American tragedy in which we all have played a part. It could go on and on and on, or someone must write the end to it. I have concluded that only I can do that, and if I can, I must. There are no historic or legal precedents to which I can turn in this matter, none that precisely fit the circumstances of a private citizen who has resigned the Presidency of the United States.

After years of bitter controversy and divisive national debate, I have been advised, and I am compelled to conclude that many months and perhaps more years will have to pass before Richard Nixon could obtain a fair trial by jury in any jurisdiction of the United States under governing decisions of the Supreme Court. I deeply believe in equal justice for all Americans, whatever their station or former station.

The law, whether human or divine, is no respecter of persons; but the law is a respecter of reality. The facts, as I see them, are that a former President of the United States, instead of enjoying equal treatment with any other citizen accused of violating the law, would be cruelly and excessively penalized either in preserving the presumption of his innocence or in obtaining a speedy determination of his guilt in order to repay a legal debt to society.

During this long period of delay and potential litigation, ugly passions would again be aroused. And our people would again be polarized in their opinions. And the credibility of our free institutions of government would again be challenged at home and abroad. In the end, the courts might well hold that Richard Nixon had been denied due process, and the verdict of history would even more be inconclusive with respect to those charges arising out of the period of his Presidency, of which I am presently aware.

But it is not the ultimate fate of Richard Nixon that most concerns me, though surely it deeply troubles every decent: My concern is the immediate future of this great country. In this, I dare not depend upon my personal sympathy as a long-time friend of the former President, nor my professional judgment as a lawyer, and I do not.

As President, my primary concern must always be the greatest good of all the people of the United States whose servant I am. As a man, my first consideration is to be true to my own convictions and my own conscience. My conscience tells me clearly and certainly that I cannot prolong the bad dreams that continue to reopen a chapter that is closed.

An Ugly Way to Die - The Rookies S03E01 | TVmaze

My conscience tells me that only I, as President, have the constitutional power to firmly shut and seal this book. My conscience tells me it is my duty, not merely to proclaim domestic tranquillity but to use every means that I have to insure it.

I do believe that the buck stops here, that I cannot rely upon public opinion polls to tell me what is right. I do believe that right makes might and that if I am wrong, 10 angels swearing I was right would make no difference. I do believe, with all my heart and mind and spirit, that I, not as President but as a humble servant of God, will receive justice without mercy if I fail to show mercy.

Finally, I feel that Richard Nixon and his loved ones have suffered enough and will continue to suffer, no matter what I do, no matter what we, as a great and good nation, can do together to make his goal of peace come true. Now, therefore, I, Gerald R. Ford, President of the United States, pursuant to the pardon power conferred upon me by Article II, Section 2, of the Constitution, have granted and by these presents do grant a full, free, and absolute pardon unto Richard Nixon for all offenses against the United States which he, Richard Nixon, has committed or may have committed or taken part in during the period from July January 20, through August 9, In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-ninth.

In accepting this pardon, I hope that his compassionate act will contribute to lifting the burden of Watergate from our country. Here in California, my perspective on Watergate is quite different than it was while I was embattled in the midst of the controversy, and while I was still subject to the unrelenting daily demands of the presidency itself. Looking back on what is still in my mind a complex and confusing maze of events, decisions, pressures and personalities, one thing I can see clearly now is that I was wrong in not acting more decisively and more forthrightly in dealing with Watergate, particularly when it reached the stage of judicial proceedings and grew from a political scandal into a national tragedy.

No words can describe the depths of my regret and pain at the anguish my mistakes over Watergate have caused the nation and the presidency -- a nation I so deeply love and an institution I so greatly respect. I know many fair-minded people believe that my motivations and action in the Watergate affair were intentionally self-serving and illegal.

I now understand how my own mistakes and misjudgments have contributed to that belief and seemed to support it. This burden is the heaviest one of all to bear. That the way I tried to deal with Watergate was the wrong way is a burden I shall bear for every day of the life that is left to me.

That Was The Question He thought he was in trouble. Today, newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst Shaw is a married mother living in Connecticut, still trying to clear her name. Meanwhile, Hearst Shaw was held for weeks in a closet. Cinque, who took his name from a famous rebel slave, was actually an escaped convict -- Donald DeFreeze, a father of six who was obsessed with weapons and was a lifelong loser in battles with the law.

Hearst Shaw metamorphosed into Tania, a member of the very group that took her prisoner.